Category Archives: Curriculum

Approaches To Developing The Curriculum

There are different ideologies regarding education, which conflict with each other. During the last century, there was a strong debate about the content and the recipient of the teaching. A certain type of knowledge, like the scientist, was more important than knowledge related to the arts and humanities. This debate continues even today. The way of planning and organizing the teaching has also been questioned. Only since this century has attention been given to the notion of expressing education in terms of specific objectives to be achieved and how to achieve it. Many efforts have been made since 1920 to treat the development of the curriculum as a scientific process. More attention has been paid to planning, including the use of specific goals and objectives, teaching and learning methods, as well as the development of materials and media, as well as attention to the review and evaluation processes. Likewise, the adoption of a more systematic approach to the elaboration of the curriculum has encouraged those who formulate it to think more carefully about the role of the recipients of the learning process, thus emphasizing the approaches that focus around the recipient. Read More About : PGP Australia

CurriculumAnother aspect that is currently being taken into account is the role that students play in developing the curriculum, and not only them but also other people or groups interested or involved in the learning process and results. In addition to the attention to the review and evaluation processes. Likewise, the adoption of a more systematic approach to the elaboration of the curriculum has encouraged those who formulate it to think more carefully about the role of the recipients of the learning process, thus emphasizing the approaches that focus Around the recipient.

Following the debate on the process of preparing the curriculum, two relevant models have emerged, the “classic” model and the “participatory” model (refer to Key Points 2 and 3). The basis that supports the participatory model is that the learning process is most effective when it “belongs” to an extensive range of actors or people involved, including students. More details on this can be found in part 3 of chapter II. However, the participatory development of the curriculum also applies to the classic model, which contains elements of great importance for those who must plan the curriculum: a systematic approach is very valuable both in this and in other activities. However, there are clear philosophical differences between the two models.